A1 Stoves

Serving Nevada County for over 20 years!

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Questions and Answers - Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs

Creosote is a byproduct of incomplete combustion. When wood burns at low temperatures, organic compounds in the wood do not completely burn and form various toxic gasses and tar droplets. These droplets stick to the surface of the chimney and firebox. Over time the creosote can build to dangerous levels. The ignition of excessive creosote causes chimney fires. The more creosote the longer the duration of the chimney fire.  Although the engineering  of fireplaces and stoves are designed to withstand a chimney fire, a breach of the system is still possible and a catastrophic house fire can occur.  If you have a chimney fire it is important to have a professional stove technician verify that your chimney is still functional and safe to use. 

Is there really a difference between a new EPA approved wood burning stove and older pre-EPA wood burning stove? 

Start by using dry seasoned wood. 

Burning hot fires will significantly reduce the chance of excessive creosote build up. It’s not always possible or cost effective to continuously burn a hot fire. We recommend that you burn a  hot fire 3 or more times a week for at least ½ hour. 

Burning wet or soft pitchy woods (pine/cedar) is more likely to cause creosote build up and clog your cap. Clogged caps are the main cause of smoke entering your living space.

Fuel: During the combustion process natural gas and propane produce carbon dioxide and water vapor. That combination along with extreme heat, over time, can cause metal components, such as thermocouples, pilot assemblies and main burners to fail.

Air quality: Most gas stoves and fireplaces today are direct venting appliances. Which means they get their combustion air from outside the living space. This design is safer than the previous gravity or B vent because the combustion chamber is sealed from the living space. This means that if there is dust, smoke, pollin or other particulates outside they are constantly entering and burning inside the sealed combustion chamber of your stove or fireplace.

Other than an unsightly film or haze on the glass, you may not notice this build-up until a component breaks down and fails. Or the haze bakes onto the glass and can no longer be removed.

The detailed answer to this is coming soon.

What Dirty Job Can We Do For You?

Wood burning fireplace insert with glass door

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How do I burn safe and efficiently?

A: Start by using dry seasoned wood. Burning hot fires will significantly reduce the chance of excessive creosote build up. It’s not always possible or cost effective to continuously burn a hot fire. We recommend that you burn a  hot fire 3 or more times a week for at least ½ hour.

Contact A1 Stove Service to schedule a  safety check up and cleaning.

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Did You Know?

Fires And Your Health

It’s a good idea to avoid breathing smoke if you can help it. Everyone should take the steps outline in the article when wildfires are present.

Read the article.

Have more questions or concerns? Please contact us! We’re here to keep you safe and warm!

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